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Sunday, July 12, 2020 | History

2 edition of Pest management of Douglas-fir tussock moth found in the catalog.

Pest management of Douglas-fir tussock moth

Roy F. Shepherd

Pest management of Douglas-fir tussock moth

procedures for insect monitoring, problem evaluation and control actions

by Roy F. Shepherd

  • 81 Want to read
  • 15 Currently reading

Published by Pacific Forestry Centre in Victoria, B.C .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Douglas-fir tussock moth -- Control.

  • Edition Notes

    StatementRoy F. Shepherd and Imre S. Otvos.
    SeriesInformation report / Pacific Forestry Centre -- BC-X-270., Information report (Pacific Forestry Centre) -- BC-X-270.
    ContributionsOtvos, Imre S. 1938-
    The Physical Object
    Pagination14 p. :
    Number of Pages14
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL16008727M
    ISBN 100662143566

    COVID Resources. Reliable information about the coronavirus (COVID) is available from the World Health Organization (current situation, international travel).Numerous and frequently-updated resource results are available from this ’s WebJunction has pulled together information and resources to assist library staff as they consider how to handle coronavirus. The whitemarked tussock moth, Orygia leucostigma (J.E. Smith), also is occasionally found in the region. This is an important pest species in the eastern United States and feeds on an extremely wide range of shrubs, fruit trees, shade trees and even conifers. Management: Several natural controls affect Douglas-fir tussock moth populations.

    Pest management of Douglas-fir tussock moth: estimating larval density by sequential sampling. Shepherd RF. The Canadian Entomologist, 01 Sep , (9): AGR: IND Share this article Share with email Share.   The whitemarked tussock moth, Orgyia leucostigma J.E. Smith (Lepidoptera: Erebidae: Lymantriinae), is common in fields, woodlands, and forests of the eastern United States and Canada but occurs as far west as Alberta, Colorado, and Texas (Furniss and Carolin , Wagner ).Larvae feed on at least species of woody host species, including virtually all woody tree and understory Author: T D Schowalter.

    Recording data. Douglas-fir tussock moth control test. Photo by: Unknown Date: Credit: USDA Forest Service, Region 6, State and Private Forestry. As a result of this integrated approach, insecticide use declined from applications per season to The boll weevil was largely eliminated as a cotton pest by A Douglas-fir tussock moth outbreak in the Pacific Northwest brought demands for application of DDT to protect forest resources.


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Pest management of Douglas-fir tussock moth by Roy F. Shepherd Download PDF EPUB FB2

Orgyia pseudotsugata. Pest description and damage The adult male is brown to gray and about 1 inch across and flies during the day in search of the wingless female moth. The larvae feed on pine needles and the mature larvae are about an inch long, hairy, gray or light brown, with black heads.

The Douglas-fir tussock moth is one of the most destructive forest defoliators in western North America. Densities of most tussock-moth populations fluctuate over time with considerable regularity.

Fluctuations in density on warm, dry sites where populations have a high intrinsic rate of increase are more likely to periodically reach outbreak Cited by: 5.

Integrated pest management of the Douglas-fir tussock moth. l"or. Ecol, Manage., The Douglas-fir tussock moth is one of the most destructive forest defoliators in western North America.

Densities of most tussock-moth populations fluctuate over time with considerable regular- by: 5. The Douglas-fir tussock moth (Orgyia pseudotsugata) is one of the most destructive forest defoliators of Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii), grand fir (Abies grandis) and white fir (A.

concolor) in western North America. An outline is given of current pest-management programmes used in Oregon, which emphasize the annual monitoring of insects in forests with outbreak histories to determine Cited by: 5. Where management objectives warrant, treatments should be applied prior to noticeable defoliation, to reduce the tussock moth population, rather than after defoliation has appeared with its associated growth loss, dieback or mortality.

The preferred treatment is the application of the biological insecticide Bacillus thuringiensis var Kurstaki (Btk). Halisidota argentata Pest description and crop damage Adult moths are brownish or tan with distinct silver-white spots on the wings.

The caterpillars can reach Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga)-Silverspotted tiger moth | Pacific Northwest Pest Management Handbooks. Douglas-fir Tussock moth virus (TM Biocontrol-1) Wild populations of the Douglas-fir tussock moth have several naturally-occurring diseases that cause mortality to certain life stages of the insect during the course of an outbreak.

The agentsnucleopolyhedrosis virus (NPV) that cause these diseases are bacteria, fungi, and viruses, among others. The hairs of Douglas-fir tussock moth larvae and moths can cause an allergic reaction called tussockosis in people, pets, and other animals. Important Habitats and Outbreak Dynamics: Most Douglas-fir tussock moth outbreaks occur east of the Cascade Mountains crest in mixed conifer stands having high proportions of Douglas-fir, grand fir, or white fir.

Pesticide Management & Coordination. The Forest Health Protection staff of the USDA Forest Service has the responsibility of managing and coordinating the proper use of pesticides within the National Forest System (NFS).

It is also responsible for providing technical advice and support, and for conducting training to maintain technical expertise.

A sequential egg-mass sample system for Douglas-fir tussock moth, Orgyia pseudotsugata McDunnough (Lepidoptera: Lymantriidae), was designed, based on visual scanning of the lower branches of Douglas-fir trees, Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco.

A branch was removed from each quadrant from the upper, middle and lower crown level, and from the lowest whorl of a total of 59. The Douglas-fir tussock moth, O. pseudotsugata, feeds primarily on Douglas-fir and true firs. Lighter-colored tufts of hair along the back, red spots on top, and an orange stripe along each side distinguish its mature larvae from those of the rusty tussock moth.

Life cycle. Tussock moths overwinter as eggs. Surviving stands are invariably in a weakened state, and very susceptible to other insects (such as the Douglas-Fir Beetle) and onally, about 20% of people and animals are allergic to Douglas-Fir Tussock Moth hairs.

These hairs are present on the larvae, the cast larval skins, the egg masses, the cocoons, and the female moth. The Douglas-fir tussock moth (Orgyia pseudotsugata McDun-nough) is an important defoliator of true firs and Douglas-fir in Wesern North America.

Severe tussock moth outbreaks have oc-Forest Insect & Disease Leaflet 86 U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service Douglas-Fir Tussock Moth Boyd E. Wickman, Richard R. Mason and Galen C. Trestle1. Objective: To review the integrated pest management practices for O.

pseudotsugata populations in British Columbia. Abstract: Douglas-fir tussock moth, Orgyia pseudotsugata (McDonnough), is a periodic defoliator of Douglas-fir, Pseudotsuga menziesii. DESCRIPTION OF THE PEST. The western tussock moth is an occasional pest in coastal apricot orchards.

A mature larva is to 1 inch long with a gray background color and numerous red, blue, and yellow spots. Four white tufts of hair emerge from its back as well as. Shepherd, R. Pest management of Douglas-fir tussock moth: estimating larval density by sequential sampling.

Canadian Entomologist Objective: To determine densities of early instar larvae of O. pseudotsugata with known precision.

Abstract: The Douglas-fir tussock moth is a major defoliator of Douglas-fir,File Size: 23KB. 35), are prevalent after pest populations reach outbreak proportions and peak during the declining phase of the outbreak cycle (52).

Pest management decisions may be guided by pathogen incidence, because increases are corre-lated with host declines (38, 49). The Douglas-fir tussock moth. Douglas-fir Tussock Moth Program (DFTM) The Douglas-fir tussock moth is a destructive native defoliator of Douglas-fir.

Outbreaks of tussock moth occur every ten to twelve years causing significant damage and mortality to Douglas-fir stands in the interior of the province. Douglas-fir Tussock Moth Management Strategy Southern Interior Forest Health Program Lorraine Maclauchlan, Ph.D.

Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations, Thompson Okanagan Region Columbia Street Kamloops, B.C. V2C 2T3 The Douglas-fir tussock moth, Orgyia pseudotsugata, is a cyclical defoliator of Interior Douglas.

• Douglas-fir tussock moth caterpillars feed on needles of spruces, Douglas-fir and true firs. • Sporadically outbreaks of Douglas-fir tussock moth occur in several Front Range communities. Less commonly it occurs as a forest pest in Colorado. • Numerous natural enemies attackin close association with the spot where they Douglas-fir tussock.

The Douglas Fir Tussock Moth during seasons of severe outbreak often cause extreme defoliation of spruce, Douglas fir and other true fir species of evergreen trees. Damage starts at the top of the tree and trees encountering multiple seasons of infestation will receive substantial damage leaving them susceptible to bark stinging insecttles and.Orgyia pseudotsugata, the Douglas-fir tussock moth, is a moth of the subfamily Lymantriinae first described by James Halliday McDunnough in It is found in western North America.

Its population periodically irrupts in cyclical caterpillars feed on the needles of Douglas fir, true fir, and spruce in summer, and moths are on the wing from July or August to November.The Douglas-fir tussock moth is a major pest of Douglas fir, spruce and other conifers in Colorado.

Larvae of the tussock moth can completely defoliate trees in forests, and it’s also a major pest in urban areas. Damage usually starts first at the tops of trees and moves downward.